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Oven is Not Heating/Oven Will Not Start

Oven is Not Heating/Oven Will Not Start

You’re not going to get much cooking done if your oven won’t heat up. If your oven happens to be giving you trouble, there’s a couple of parts that we can look at to try to make it work like new again. Oven repairs might be intimidating but diagnosing the problem and making the necessary fix is a cinch when you know what you’re doing. That’s where we come in: check out the info below to find out what part you might need to replace, how to test the parts involved with heating up the oven, and follow the links to check out our selection of parts to see if we have what you need. 


Bake Element


The bake element is absolutely crucial to the proper functioning of your oven. Even though both the bake and broil are used when cooking, the bake element does the brunt of the work when you hit that “bake” button. While you can test it with a multimeter to get the full story, a damaged bake element will often show visual signs of damage - if there’s cracks, separations, visible wear and tear, etc., then your bake element probably needs to be replaced.

But the easiest way to tell if your bake element is working or not: does it heat up? Use the oven’s bake button and allow it a few minutes to heat up. After that, turn it off, and carefully check to see if the element heated up at all. If it does not heat up at all, it’s safe to say that the bake element must be replaced.

Because bake and broil elements work so closely together, Snap Supply offers bake and broil element kits to save you time, money, and headache. 


How to Troubleshoot a Bake Element:

Note: this process can require a multimeter


  1. Disconnect the oven from its power source.
  2. Remove the back panel to access the bake element’s terminals.
  3. Visually inspect the element - if there’s visible damage like cracks, separations, excessive wear and tear, etc., then the element will need to be replaced.
  4. If the element looks fine, it’s time to test it with the multimeter - remove the element.
  5. Set the multimeter to the RX1 setting and test the terminals using the probes.
  6. You should receive a reading between 19 and 115 ohms - the exact reading you’re looking for will depend on your oven, so you can consult the owner’s manual for more information.
  7. If you’re receiving a reading outside of that range, then your bake element must be replaced.

Don’t forget: just because parts look the same does not mean that they are the same. Make sure to use cross reference information and model numbers to confirm compatibility with your refrigerator.


Find the right bake element for your oven here!


Broil Element


The broil element lives at the top of the oven. It’s the part that gets very hot when you hit the “broil” button. Even when you’re just using your oven’s standard “bake” settings, the broil element heats up as a way of backing up the bake element and ensuring everything cooks evenly. 

If your broil element is damaged/malfunctioning but your bake element is still working, then you may not notice any changes when you’re simply using the “bake” setting. Maybe your food is not cooking as quickly as it used to. But a malfunctioning broil element will make it impossible to get the results that you’re looking for using the broil setting.

Luckily, it’s easy to visually examine the broil element for wear and tear. Signs of visible damage most likely indicate that the broil element is out of commission. You can also carefully check to see if it’s heating up when using the oven on the “broil” setting. Otherwise, you can use a multimeter to test it using the steps below.


Because bake and broil elements work so closely together, Snap Supply offers bake and broil element kits to save you time, money, and headache. 


How to Troubleshoot a Broil Element:

Note: this process can require a multimeter


  1. Disconnect the oven from its power source.
  2. Remove the back panel to access the broil element’s terminals - if you see signs of damage/wear and tear, then the broil element might have to be replaced.
  3. Use the multimeter to test the element by disconnecting its terminals and testing them with the probes - be sure to use the RX1 setting.
  4. You’re looking for a reading between 19 and 115 ohms. Consult your owner’s manual to find the exact reading that you should expect.
  5. If the reading is outside of the acceptable range, then you must replace your broil element.

Don’t forget: just because parts look the same does not mean that they are the same. Make sure to use cross reference information and model numbers to confirm compatibility with your refrigerator.


Find the broil element that’s right for your oven here! 


Control Board

The control board is your oven’s brain. It controls both the heating elements in the oven and the surface elements on the range. And if your oven’s brain has been damaged in any way, it can lead to problems with your oven’s functionality. Checking up on the oven’s control board involves a quick eyeball test: does it look like it’s been damaged? Are there visible signs of burns, or wear and tear in general? Follow the steps below to check up on your control board and see if it is functioning correctly.


How to Troubleshoot an Oven Control Board:


  1. Disconnect the oven from its power source.
  2. The control board is typically behind the control panel on top of your oven or range - depending on your oven model, you will have to remove the control panel or top panel to access and remove the control board.
  3. If there are any visible signs of damage or wear and tear - burns, cracks, etc - you might need to replace your control board.

Don’t forget: just because parts look the same does not mean that they are the same. Make sure to use cross reference information and model numbers to confirm compatibility with your refrigerator.


Find the control board that’s right for your oven here!

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